New Mexico Junior College

Tbird

Sexual Assault/Harassment (Title IX)

Title IX

Pertinent Information

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities which receive federal financial assistance. Title IX states, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

Discrimination based on sex, including discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery from any of these conditions. The federal Title IX regulation also prohibits a school from applying any rule related to a student’s parental, family, or marital status that treats students differently based on their sex.

NMJC is committed to providing a workplace and educational environment, as well as other benefits, programs, and activities, that are free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. To ensure compliance with federal and state civil rights laws and regulations, and to affirm its commitment to promoting the goals of fairness and equity in all aspects of the educational program or activity, NMJC has developed internal policies and procedures that provide a prompt, fair, and impartial process for those involved in an allegation of discrimination or harassment on the basis of protected class status, and for allegations of retaliation. NMJC values and upholds the equal dignity of all members of its community and strives to balance the rights of the parties in the grievance process during what is often a difficult time for all those involved.

Prohibited Behavior 

New Mexico Junior College does not tolerate and expressly prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, sexual abuse, or gender-based discrimination at all College sponsored activities, events, and/or programs.

What Can You Do About Sexual Violence?

NMJC is committed to maintaining a positive learning, working and living environment and will not tolerate acts of sexual harassment or sexual violence or related retaliation against or by any employee or student. When sexual harassment or sexual violence has occurred and is brought to the attention of a Title IX official, NMJC will take steps to end the harassment or violence, prevent its re-occurrence and address its effects.

NMJC Title IX Booklet

College is a space for personal growth, learning, and new opportunity, but it is not absent from certain dangers. You don’t need to be overly concerned, but you should do your best to remain alert to your surroundings and anything that is out-of-the-ordinary.

If you see or hear these things, tell someone in authority immediately:

  • Harassment, threats, or bullying, online or in-person
  • “Hate speech” or threats made online or in-person
  • Domestic or intimate partner abuse or violence
  • Comments from a student about harming self or others
  • Someone acting suspiciously or carrying a weapon

 

Don’t be a bystander!  Students are often the first to become aware of problems on campus. However, due to a social phenomenon called the “bystander effect”, sometimes problems are not addressed.  The bystander effect happens when the presence of others (being in a group) discourages an individual from intervening in a situation in which there is an emergency. Researchers Bibb Latane and John Darley argued that it is the result of the belief that someone else will act so I don’t need to, that is compounded by social influence (the fact that our behaviors are influenced by those around us).

  • Stay alert – Don’t wear earbuds or headphones while walking! You may not hear someone behind you.
  • Walk in high-traffic, well-lit areas at night.
  • Request an escort when feeling unsafe.
  • Keep your car and dorm apartments and windows closed and locked.
  • Don’t let strangers into housing facilities and do not prop doors.
  • Don’t lend out your ID.
  • Take self-defense classes.
  • In the event of a crisis, don’t panic. Run if possible, hide if you can’t run, and fight if you can’t hide.

 

Reduce your risk: most sexual assaults involve people who know each other – and are using alcohol and/or other drugs. Staying sober is your best defense against sexual assault.

It’s hard to know what to do, how to feel, or what your options are after a sexual assault. Please know that you’re not alone. Below are some things to keep in mind. If you are in immediate danger or seriously injured, call 911.

Get to a safe place. Get to a location where you can call for help, preferably a safe place where you are not alone. Consider reaching out to someone you trust or call 911.

Call the crisis hotline at (575)226-7263 to speak to a trained victim’s advocate. An advocate will be able to walk you through the next steps and help you make an informed decision based on your wishes and consent for care.

Seek medical attention. Even if you do not want to report the assault immediately, still consider having a physical exam. Survivors may or may not have physical injuries and it is best to be seen by a trained medical professional for evaluation. It is important to determine the risks of STIs and pregnancy and have the option of preventive medications. Forensic evidence can be collected and stored in case you decide to report at a later date.

Seek free, confidential counseling. NMJC counselors are here to help you. They are located in the Ben Alexander building or you can call (575)492-2577 to speak an NMJC counselor on the phone or to make an appointment. They are here to help, and can refer you to additional resources if needed. It's never too late to call; many survivors do not realize they need counseling help until months or years later.

Report to campus authorities. Even if you do not wish to file a formal complaint, campus authorities can provide assistance and guidance related to interim measures for your safety and well-being. Survivors are not required to file a crime report, but are encouraged to do so and will be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement, if they choose. Regardless of whether a survivor opts to file a crime report, interim or protective measures will be provided if the survivor requests them and if they are reasonably available.

On-campus resources:

  • Public Safety 24-hour Line (575)399-2033
  • Title IX Coordinator (575)492-2761
  • Housing 24-hour on-call line (575)399-4681
  • Counseling (575)492-2577
  • Financial Aid (575) 492-2561
  • Veteran’s and international students (575) 392-5112

 

Off-campus resources:

  • Police/Emergency – 911
  • Guidance Center of Lea County (575)393-3168
  • ARISE 24/7 Crisis Hotline (575)226-7263
  • RAINN 24/7 Get Help Line (800)656-4673

 

If you are a witness to a crime of sexual violence you should report the incident to campus security or local police or speak to the Vice President for Student Services (the Title IX Coordinator) who can assist you with further reporting as appropriate.

In all cases, both complainant and respondent are afforded prompt, fair and impartial due process, including the opportunity to have an advisor/support person present during any hearings and access to free, confidential counseling services.

Say something. Lend a listening ear. Show that you care and are willing to listen.

Do not force the issue but allow the individual to confide in you at his/her own pace. Never blame the person for what is happening or underestimate his/her fear of potential danger. Focus on supporting the individual’s right to make his/her own decisions.

Guide survivors to campus and community resources. Let him/her know they are not alone and people are available to help. Encourage him/her to seek sexual violence advocates and assure them that information will be kept confidential in most cases.

Do not judge victims. Tell the person that you are sorry that they have been hurt. No matter his/her behavior prior to the assault, no one deserves to be assaulted.

Find your own support. You cannot support someone else if you are not supported, however do not try to receive that support from the survivor.

1 in 3 women—and 1 in 4 men—have been in abusive relationships. Women between the ages of 18 - 24 are most commonly abused by an intimate partner - NCADV.

NMJC is a member of the Association of Title IX Administrators and participates in training provided by them. Information related to training can be found at: https://www.atixa.org/2020-regulations-requirement-posting-of-training-materials/